Tag: identity struggles

What does being ‘Coloured’ mean in South Africa?

What does being ‘Coloured’ mean in South Africa?

My name is Kelly and I was born in the mid 80’s, in South Africa, Cape Town more specifically. It was during this time that South Africans were finally able to see that the end of the Apartheid era was coming. During the oppressive regime […]

The Struggles of Living & Leaving: Life as a Chinese Canadian

The Struggles of Living & Leaving: Life as a Chinese Canadian

  “There’s no way you’re traveling to Australia on your own. I’ll take your passport away.”   These were the exact words my father told me after feeling elated at buying a return flight to Sydney during my sophomore year in college. I wasn’t exactly […]

Growing up in America being Black- but Not Black Enough

Growing up in America being Black- but Not Black Enough

  I am an African American woman born in 1987, well after the 60’s, which was when black people were still fighting for their equality in a racially-divided America. I wasn’t born into the hardships of the laws that enforced racial segregation in the southern […]

Comments, criticism and courage: What it’s like being a desi parent

Comments, criticism and courage: What it’s like being a desi parent

If you’re an Indian person living outside of India, you should be familiar with the term desi. You should know that the word desi—derived from the Ancient Sanskrit word for “country”—is a term used for anything derived from the Indian subcontinent. And my family- with our Indian […]

Being Mixed Race- But Never The Right Mix

Being Mixed Race- But Never The Right Mix

Imma be honest. It’s…difficult for me to write about the nuances that come with being a mixed person. Not because there aren’t any, because there are A LOT, but because…I’ve never felt validated to complain. As my black cousins would say, “You’re exotic, but not […]

Growing up in a western society being brown- but not brown ENOUGH

Growing up in a western society being brown- but not brown ENOUGH

For as long as I can remember I always knew I was of Indian descent. It’s important to note that I knew this before I learnt that I was South African. My family’s bloodline can be clearly traced all the way back to 4 generations […]


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